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FAQ

 
  1. How far can you go in an electric boat?
  2. How fast are electric boats?
  3. Can't I just use a trolling motor?
  4. How reliable are electric outboards?
  5. How can I be sure that I won't run my batteries down?

How far can you go in an electric boat?

Well-designed displacement boats powered by a Ray Electric Outboard have a cruising range of over 70 miles (@ over 6mph) on a single charge.

How fast are electric boats?

Electric boats operate in a displacement mode (non-planing). The imperical formula (formula developed from tests) for the speed of displacement boats is:

Speed in knots = 1.34 sqrt.gifL (where L = waterline length)

This gives the "hull speed" or the highest practical speed without using excessive power. For example, for a 25ft waterline length:

S = 1.34 sqrt.gif25
S = 6.7 Knots, or 6.7 x 1.15 = 7.7 mph

Can't I just use a trolling motor?

No. Trolling motors are not designed as a primary source of power for a boat. They are designed as a secondary means of power. Using a trolling motor as a primary source of power, you will find that they are not very dependable and that they do not have sufficient power. If you expect your boat to have the dependability and power to get you home when the wind kicks up, you need a Ray Electric Outboard.

How reliable are electric outboards?

Very reliable if you choose a quality motor. Ray Electric Outboards began producing motors in 1974, and currently there are less than .01% of our motors out of service. Our motors have a renowned reputation in which reliability has played a significant role.

How can I be sure that I won't run my batteries down?

Unlike flashlights, games and cordless drills, today's electric boats are equipped with meters that act as fuel gauges. A Ray Electric Outboard comes equipped with a voltmeter, which warns of low batteries. In addition, we can provide an ammeter (indicates the amps being used) or an E meter (indicates the amount of run time by the amps being used). You are no more likely to run out of battery than run out of gas with a gasoline boat.